Go, Igo, Weiqi, Baduk Go, Igo, Weiqi, Baduk. Kaz's original Igo-advice & fundamentals of Igo: Q&A for fundamentals of Igo & Kaz's Igo advice


I can't helping thinking about a move for a long time! Well, pls read this!

I can't helping thinking about a move for a long time! Well, pls read this!



Recently a student asked me about how he should manage the time
because he loves to think of a move for a long time. In fact
since he likes to think each move for a long time, he likes to play offline.

I answered as follows:

To be honest with you, since I was a child, I always couldn't
play quickly. I had to think, think, and think...
Even if I became an insei, and even if I had 4 hours in the final insei
tournament, I couldn't stop thinking. I spent 4 hours in 100 moves or so.
It was a terrible habit.

Interestingly, after I quit an insei (Go apprentice), I could start playing fast.
Over the years I have also observed many people, teenagers and adults who couldn't stop thinking.
Based on my experiences, I'd like to tell you what I have discovered and learned over the years.

1. Thinking a move for a long time does not necessarily help you play a better game.

2. Thinking a move for a long time in a game does not necessarily make you strong.

3. When you play a game, there are points at which you have to think; that is a life-and-death situation and a capturing race.
But there are many situations where you will never know the best moves.

Let me elaborate on these.

With regard to 1. and 2., I need more explanations.

The reason thinking a move will not help you is that
without solidifying the strong basic foundations, you may not be thinking
correctly. If your thoughts were incorrect from the beginning, you may very well
end up with an incorrect result.

( My definition of basic foundations is that there are basic foundations for 10 kyu players, for
5 kyu players, for 1 dan players, and so on. I believe that you should learn various levels of
basics as you improve. )

This happens often because you still have to learn a lot about tesuji,
life-and-death, shape, etc. at your level. It takes time to learn one tesuji.

This is why I always emphasize learning basics.

With regard to 3., there were interesting Go articles in Japan, asking top pros to play where in the middle of a game.

Almost always every top pros play different moves. This means that even top pros may not know what's the best.

Go is that deep, I guess.

Cho U 9dan wrote in his book that he always intentionally plays fast. He's been
doing that since he was an insei and even now. The reason is that when there
is a crucial moment in a game, he needs time. When he has time, he could find
the best move or a winning move. His opponent often doesn't have time and makes a mistake.

Of course, he is one of the strongest Go players, and that's why he has won
lots of titles in Japan. But even for him, how to manage the time is strategically important.

I do understand that it can be very frustrating not to have time in an online game
when you need time. I send the following advice to those who play tournaments.
But I'm pretty sure that these are also helpful to you, too, when you play online.


☆ Go advice ☆

★ The time ★

When you play a tournament, you have only limited amount of time. You shouldn't spend time on the opening. You should use your time in the middle game, especially fight and life-and-death.

And in the endgame if you don't have time, you often end up miserably. Even if you are 20 points or 30 points ahead, your opponent could turn around the situation if you don't have time to think. I have experienced this so many times when I was an insei. So use your time wisely.

When I play a game, as soon as I play a move, I try to think of possible opponent moves and come up with a response. So when an opponent plays a move, I can immediately respond to it without spending the time.

When I made a mistake and was way behind in the middle of a game, this strategy really worked well because towards the end of a game, my opponent had little time left, and I had more time, and I managed to find a move to turn around a game.

Of course, it's easier said than done. But that may be something to think about.


★ The openinge ★

In order not to spend time in the opening, I think the following advice helps.

When you're Black, you should certainly play your favorite opening.

The problem is White. When you are White, you should try to prevent your opponent from playing her / his favorite opening such as the Chinese opening (fuseki).

The Chinese fuseki is really hard to tackle unless you have studied it extensively. Even if you have studied the Chinese fuseki, new patterns come up often, and it's very hard to keep up with everything.

Later on when I played a tournament in Tokyo, and when my opponent played the first move at Q16 and the third move at Q3, I played my fourth move at Q5 immediately (for kyu players, I recommend Q5 and not R5 because R5 has far more variations). After this, he and I had to face a new fuseki. So whoever strong was likely to win (and I won).

If I had let him play the Chinese fuseki, he would have played the fuseki just like top pros play. So all his moves were as wonderful as top pros up to a certain moves. But when I played the fourth move at Q5, he had to play his own moves rather than top pros' moves. So it's much harder for him to good moves.

In addition, if you let your opponents play their favorite fuseki, it's very likely that they don't spend time because they know what to do, but you probably have to spend time on finding out how to tackle an unfamiliar fuseki. So you may lose your time very fast in the opening.

To prevent your opponents from play their favorite fuseki may also be helpful psychologically. If you prevent that, they can be discouraged.

I'm sorry that this is getting too long.

I really hope this helps.

You could think an Igo move for a long time sometimes when...

You could think an Igo move for a long time sometimes when...



There are exceptions!ひらめき

There are times when you have to think for a while
during a Igo game.



When?

Well, when you face a life-and-death problems in your game,
or a capturing race, or a tesuji to capture a big
group of stones, then you have to think carefully
and read moves through.
ちっ(怒った顔)

If you can't read the entire moves, then you have to give
up and play.ふらふら


But if you could read through, then you would want to spend
enough time to read all of them through, right?

In that case, you may have to think of your move
for a long time.

(If you play on the Internet, then you have a time limit,
so obviously you can't do that.)時計


At the end if you can't find the right answer, you need
to stick with your instinct, which comes from how much
you have studied basics.
ひらめき


Last but not least, in my experience generally
those amateur players who don't think for
a long time tend to learn faster than
those who think excessively or think each move
for a long time, assuming that these Go players
study the same amount of time.



So in a case of a life-and-death problem, or
a capturing race, or a tesuji to capture a big
group of stones in your game, you might want to read for 5
minutes.

10 minutes maybe be the maximum.

If you contemplate more than 10 minutes, then your
opponent gets upset, so I think 10 minute is a long
thinking...


Another exception is that if your opponent loves
to think for a long time, and both of you agree
to play a long game, then it's possible to think
for a long time.

I have a friend in Washington who is 5-dan
and who loves to think for a long time.

So in his case, fast games are not enjoyable.

I still think fast games is better, but
he's 5-dan, which means he is strong enough.

Also if he enjoys thinking, and he has Igo
friends who also like to think, then,
I'd say "Go head and play a long game!"


If you don't enjoy playing Igo, that's the worst case...もうやだ〜(悲しい顔)


BTW, today I read a very interesting Igo article in the
Nikkei Shimbun
, which is equivalent to the Wall Street
Journal in the States.

The Nikkei Shimbun sponsors the Oza Title.

There is a game between Iyama Yuta 8-dan pro and Huang Yih Tzuu 7-dan pro.

To be continued...

I think for a long time... Well, Kaz doesn't recommend that! Why? Part II

I think for a long time... Well, Kaz doesn't recommend that! Why? Part II




Right now free Igo lessons are available. ひらめきThe details
are on this website: http://www.kazsensei.com/fees

Also in yesterday's blog, there was a wise comment from someone.ぴかぴか(新しい)

To respond to that, I wrote something very important.


So please take a look!
http://kazsensei.seesaa.net/article/105958719.html

----------------------------------------------------------

Yesterday I said:

> You should improve your instinct of Go;
> as a kyu player, feelings are more important.

I'd like to add more to this.

Of course, you can't develop your instinct suddenly.

To develop your instinct, you not only make a very
good foundation of Igo, but also play many games.

You need both.

So if you play fast, you have more time to learn
basics and play more games.


Now I'd like to continue yesterday's Igo blog.

I have more to say.


Yes, I understand that you're thinking for a
long time in order to find a good move.

Yes, I completely understand that you're thinking for a
long time in order to improve your Igo.

And you may find a good move.

But usually when people think for a long time,
many people play a wrong move.

Even top pros play a wrong move when they think
for a long time. Actually it's not rareexclamation&question

And top pros know so many things...


But amateurs still have a lot to learn, especially
kyu players.


So "thinking for a long time" doesn't mean that
"it's productive" or "you learn more" or
"you become strong".


Another thing I'd like to say is that, you
don't have to think of your next move excruciatingly.ちっ(怒った顔)

It's better to play more casually and have fun.
わーい(嬉しい顔)

And after the game, you should spend more time
on reviewing your game or learning basics of Igo
from books or something.



I hope I'm explaining it understandably without offending
anybody.

If I did, I apologize...

There are exceptions, of course!

There are times when you have to think for a long time,
which is...

I think for a long time... Well, Kaz doesn't recommend that! Why?

I think for a long time... Well, Kaz doesn't recommend that! Why?



In my last blog, one of my Igo students says:

> I take it too seriously. I don't play enough, or
> playfully enough. I take too long with my moves. がく〜(落胆した顔)


As a kyu player, you shouldn't think for a long time.

You should enjoy Igo.ひらめき

You should enjoy playing fast.わーい(嬉しい顔)

That way, you should learn more.グッド(上向き矢印)


Instead of thinking a long time, you should spend
more time learning basics of Igo.


Playing games is important.

But I believe that learning basics is far more
important.ぴかぴか(新しい)

Just playing games will never make you learn
basics unless some Go teacher review your games
all the time.

If you read good books carefully, you can
learn basics.



So you should have a good balance here.
exclamation

As a kyu player, you should learn a lot of basics.

Of course, you can't learn all the basics in a flash.

It takes a long time.

Really... a long time learn a lot of basics.

(Many people get tired of that and stop learning the basics.)



So every game, you face many difficult situations and
seemingly impossible-to-understand moments.

(No matter how strong you become, you still face
countless situations in which you never know
the best moves.)

In that case, you should stick with your feelings.

You should improve your instinct of Go;
as a kyu player, feelings are more important.


(Feelings are important for dan players, as well.
I think Takemiya Masaki 9p Sensei also says that, too.

Of course, his words are much bigger and much
greater than my words!!!パンチ)


Without having a solid basics, even if you think
for a long time, you may not find a good move.

Moreover, I'm afraid that the following may
happen, especially to adults.

If you think for a long time without a solid
basic foundation, you often create your own
way of playing, which is known as
"自己流" (jikoryu) もうやだ〜(悲しい顔)
in Japanese.

I once explained "jikoryu" on my Kaz Igo (Weiqi, Baduk)
blog here: http://kazsensei.seesaa.net/article/103746721.html


To be continued...

Igo player asked me a serious concern... Kaz's advice is...

Igo player asked me a serious concern... Kaz's advice is...



Since the number of Igo visitors is decreasing右斜め下, I'm thinking
about moving my "US Go Congress" to a different blog...ちっ(怒った顔)

I think I should focus on just giving advice in this Igo
(Weiqi, Baduk) blog
...

The other day, one of the Igo players told me his concernsがく〜(落胆した顔)
about Igo and asked me for advice.


Here is his email ( I got his permission to put it on my Igo
blog):

---------------------------------

When I was last studying go, many years ago,
I played as an AGA 5 kyu, and decided to try
playing at 4.

I quit shortly thereafter, but I hope I am
still near 4 kyu.

Now that my son is learning I feel deeply
interested in Igo again. I want to overcome
the blocks which have prevented me from
becoming a stronger player.

There are some issues of temperament.

Although I love Igo and am awakened and
delighted whenever I play, I take it too seriously.

I don't play enough, or playfully enough.
I take too long with my moves.

Consequently I've been too shy to play in public,
or online - but I will overcome these bad tendencies!

I want to learn to play quickly, intuitively
and boldly, to experiment and be willing to
lose, but still play in a way that I can be proud of.

Can you help me to understand go more deeply,
and to play with greater spontaneity and courage?

I should not place such a burden on you,
for these are my responsibility.

Because you already are a respected teacher,
I want you to understand how seriously
I wish to progress.

------------------------------------------------

Here is my email responding to his concerns:

------------------------------------------------

> When I was last studying Igo, many years ago,
> I played as an AGA 5 kyu, and decided to try
> playing at 4.


That sounds reasonable. You should be able to
get back to 4 kyu fairly easily as long as you
study properly.


> Now that my son is learning i feel deeply
> interested in Igo again.

Wonderful!!! I'll teach you, and you'll teach him. :)


> I want to overcome the blocks which have
> prevented me from becoming a stronger player....
>
>
> I take it too seriously. I don't play enough, or
> playfully enough. I take too long with my moves.


That's not good.

But I perfectly understand know how you feel.

Believe it or not, I used to be one of them. ふらふら

As a kyu player...
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